Saturday, April 18, 2015

ICAC's powers queried in Sydney court


 Lawyers for former NSW Labor minister Ian Macdonald have queried the state corruption watchdog's powers.


Lawyers for former NSW Labor minister Ian Macdonald have queried the state corruption watchdog's powers in court a day after the ICAC's humbling defeat at the High Court. 

Mr Macdonald's lawyers argued a misconduct in public office charge should be dropped as it was improperly initiated by the ICAC, Downing Centre Local Court heard on Thursday. 

'This is an unauthorised prosecution,' defence barrister Phillip Boulten said. 

'They're not a police force and they're not a prosecuting agency.' 

Macdonald is still facing the same charge in the Supreme Court. 

The charge against the former Labor minister relates to his alleged handling of a lucrative mining licence at Doyles Creek in the Hunter Valley, which emerged in a high-profile ICAC inquiry. 

Ex-CFMEU official John Maitland is alleged to have earned $15 million out of his activities at Doyles Creek from a $165,000 investment and is also before the courts. 

Mr Boulten also asked for his client to be paid legal costs. 

The challenge to ICAC's powers comes a day after it lost a High Court challenge against its investigation into senior NSW prosecutor Margaret Cunneen.
 


skynews.com.au 16 Apr 2015

Australia a criminal's playgournd*.

A 'mecca' for white collar criminals, criminal police, politicians and judges using 'force' to enslave and oppress the general populous into corporate submission.

* - provided you are one of the ones supported.

Lawyers for former NSW Labor minister Ian Macdonald have queried the state corruption watchdog's powers.
Lawyers for former NSW Labor minister Ian Macdonald have queried the state corruption watchdog's powers in court a day after the ICAC's humbling defeat at the High Court.
Mr Macdonald's lawyers argued a misconduct in public office charge should be dropped as it was improperly initiated by the ICAC, Downing Centre Local Court heard on Thursday.
'This is an unauthorised prosecution,' defence barrister Phillip Boulten said.
'They're not a police force and they're not a prosecuting agency.'
Macdonald is still facing the same charge in the Supreme Court.
The charge against the former Labor minister relates to his alleged handling of a lucrative mining licence at Doyles Creek in the Hunter Valley, which emerged in a high-profile ICAC inquiry.
Ex-CFMEU official John Maitland is alleged to have earned $15 million out of his activities at Doyles Creek from a $165,000 investment and is also before the courts.
Mr Boulten also asked for his client to be paid legal costs.
The challenge to ICAC's powers comes a day after it lost a High Court challenge against its investigation into senior NSW prosecutor Margaret Cunneen.
- See more at: http://www.skynews.com.au/news/national/2015/04/16/icac-s-powers-queried-in-sydney-court.html#sthash.ePHlvh0h.dpuf

1 comment:

Michael Mallal said...

I think the defence barrister is right in saying ICAC is not a prosecuting agency. The case has been referred to NSW ODPP I think.