Saturday, August 31, 2013

Crocodile takes IT worker Sean Cole at birthday party on Mary River

AN Adelaide debt collector found dead in his front yard was killed with a machete, police have revealed. 
 
They have released images of a Gerber brand machete identical to the one used used in the murder of Allen Amin Asrawe, 33, in suburban Paradise on August 9.

At the time police said the victim was in the debt recovery business and had links to criminal associates.
They believed he may have been ambushed on his way home from work in the city which he had left at about 4.30am (CST).

Details of how he died were not released, but police on Friday released the images in the hope that someone may recognise the weapon which was found at the scene.

A 25-year-old man from Paralowie was charged with the murder on August 18.

Police on Friday alleged that he was with at least one other person when Mr Asrawe was murdered and are examining DNA samples collected at the scene as part of the investigation.

Investigators are also looking to speak to anyone who may have seen a black Audi TT Coupe in the area in the early hours of August 9, or on previous days.

adelaidenow.com.au 30 Aug 2013

Debt collection is UNLAWFUL in Australia.

The 'authorities' would have you believe otherwise, in order to instill subservience in the uneducated masses.

The legal profession is fully aware that since there is 'no binding contract' between yourself and the 'debt collector', no monies are ever owed to the 'collection agency'.

The aim of the game is for the masses to spend thousands in lawyer and court costs in order to 'prove' this.

ALL COLLECTION AGENCIES ARE FRAUDULENT.

Governments allow for this unlawful practice to continue, in effect supporting and perpetuating the fraud.

Machete used to murder SA debt collector

AN Adelaide debt collector found dead in his front yard was killed with a machete, police have revealed. 
 
They have released images of a Gerber brand machete identical to the one used used in the murder of Allen Amin Asrawe, 33, in suburban Paradise on August 9.

At the time police said the victim was in the debt recovery business and had links to criminal associates.
They believed he may have been ambushed on his way home from work in the city which he had left at about 4.30am (CST).

Details of how he died were not released, but police on Friday released the images in the hope that someone may recognise the weapon which was found at the scene.

A 25-year-old man from Paralowie was charged with the murder on August 18.

Police on Friday alleged that he was with at least one other person when Mr Asrawe was murdered and are examining DNA samples collected at the scene as part of the investigation.

Investigators are also looking to speak to anyone who may have seen a black Audi TT Coupe in the area in the early hours of August 9, or on previous days.

adelaidenow.com.au 30 Aug 2013

Debt collection is UNLAWFUL in Australia.

The 'authorities' would have you believe otherwise, in order to instill subservience in the uneducated masses.

The legal profession is fully aware that since there is 'no binding contract' between yourself and the 'debt collector', no monies are ever owed to the 'collection agency'.

The aim of the game is for the masses to spend thousands in lawyer and court costs in order to 'prove' this.

ALL COLLECTION AGENCIES ARE FRAUDULENT.

Governments allow for this unlawful practice to continue, in effect supporting and perpetuating the fraud.

Friday, August 30, 2013

Government agents in 74 countries demanded Facebook data on 38,000 users

GOVERNMENT agents in 74 countries demanded information on about 38,000 Facebook users in the first half of this year, with about half the orders coming from the United States.
 
The social-networking giant is the latest technology company to release figures on how often governments seek information about its customers. Microsoft and Google have done the same.

As with the other companies, it's hard to discern much from Facebook's data, besides the fact that, as users around the globe flocked to the world's largest social network, police and intelligence agencies followed.

Facebook and Twitter have become organising platforms for activists and, as such, have become targets for governments.

During anti-government protests in Turkey in May and June, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan called social media "the worst menace to society."

At the time, Facebook denied it provided information about protest organisers to the Turkish government.

Data released today show authorities in Turkey submitted 96 requests covering 173 users. Facebook said it provided some information in about 45 of those cases, but there's no information on what was turned over and why.

"We fight many of these requests, pushing back when we find legal deficiencies and narrowing the scope of overly broad or vague requests," Colin Stretch, Facebook's general counsel company said in a blog post.

"When we are required to comply with a particular request, we frequently share only basic user information, such as name."

Facebook and other technology companies have been criticised for helping the National Security Agency secretly collect data on customers.

Federal law gives government the authority to demand data without specific warrants, and while companies can fight requests in secret court hearings, it's an uphill battle.

Facebook turned over some data in response to about 60 percent of those requests.

It's not clear from the Facebook data how many of the roughly 26,000 government requests on 38,000 users were for law-enforcement purposes and how many were for intelligence gathering.

Technology and government officials have said criminal investigations are far more common than national security matters as a justification for demanding information from companies.

The numbers are imprecise because the federal government forbids companies from revealing how many times they've been ordered to turn over information about their customers. Facebook released only a range of figures for the United States.

The company said it planned to start releasing these figures regularly.

news.com.au 28 Aug 2013

Australian spies in global deal to tap undersea cables